The average person is bombarded by XENOESTROGENS every day.

Fight Back.

Introduction to Xenoestrogens

Frequently Asked Questions

Xenoestrogens belong to a group of man-made, environmental chemicals known as endocrine disruptors. Once endocrine disruptors are in the body, they mimic the hormone estrogen and are capable of binding to estrogen receptors throughout the body. This blocks the action of natural hormones, which significantly disrupts the body’s fragile hormonal balance and compromises normal hormone function. This is particularly detrimental to hormone sensitive organs like the uterus and breast, the immune and neurological systems, as well as human development.

Ingesting Xenoestrogens

Chemicals in the products we use and love, like fragrances and plastics, contain xenoestrogens. Exposure to xenoestrogens happens in 3 ways: inhalation, ingestion and absorption through the skin.

Ingesting xenoestrogens via food, pesticides, cookware, and plastic containers is a common way to expose yourself. Conventional, non-organic fruits and vegetables contain pesticides, herbicides and fungicides which are known endocrine disruptors. Pesticide exposure also comes from foods that contains genetically-modified ingredients (GMO), including soy, corn, canola and sugar beets.

One of the most dangerous type of xenoestrogens are bisphenols (BPA and BPA analogues), used in the production of certain plastics and resins. These xenoestrogens are found in plastic containers, canned food, and plastic bottles. Xenoestrogens are capable of being passed to food from plastic packaging and may also be found in food preservatives, such as BHA and red food dye.

Conventional meats and dairy products may contain hormones and pesticides, which disrupt the body’s fragile hormone balance.

Ingesting xenoestrogens can also happen via your non-stick pots & pans made before 2014, which contain poly- and perfluorinated chemicals (aka: teflon). At temperatures above 300oC, teflon coatings on non-stick cookware start to break down, releasing toxic chemicals into the air, and into your food.  Pots and pans with scratches, peeling, flaking or chipping especially allow the chemicals to come into contact with your food much more easily.

Inhaling Xenoestrogens

Inhaling xenoestrogens includes breathing gases, vapors, dusts and mists from smelling candles, perfume & cologne, household cleaners, personal care products, fabric softener, all types of smoke, vehicle exhaust, new car smell, new furniture, plastic off-gasing smell (ie: the $1 store smell!), and anything with a synthetic fragrance.


Absorbing Xenoestrogens Through the Skin

Xenoestrogens can readily absorb through the skin, which offers an easy route to the bloodstream. The most common type of xenoestrogen in skin care products are parabens (methylparaben, ethylparaben, propylparaben and butylparaben), forms of benzone in sunscreen, and phthalates. These xenoestrogens are found in make-up, lotion, sunscreen, hair products, nail polish & remover, and so much more. I highly recommend examining every ingredient on the products you purchase for yourself and your children.

Liver Detoxification

The liver is the body’s primary detoxifying organ, making it critical to support its normal detoxification processes. Many toxins, including xenoestrogens, behave like fats so the liver must convert these toxins into substances that will dissolve in the blood. This conversion process happens in two phases and requires specific nutrients from food or supplements. Once toxins and xenoestrogens are capable of being transported into the urine and stool, they can be eliminated from the body.

Phase 1

Support with:

  • B-vitamins (Riboflavin (Vit. B2), Niacin (Vit B1), Pyridoxine (Vit B6), Folate (5-MTHF), Vitamin B12)
  • Antioxidants (Flavonoids, Polyphenols, Carotenoids, Curcuminoids, EGCG)
  • NAC/Glutathione
  • Vitamin C
  • Vitamin A
  • Vitamin E
  • Zinc

Phase 2

Support with:

  • Selenium
  • Sulphur-rich foods (ie: sprouts, broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, Brussels sprouts, garlic, onion, mustard powder, ginger)
  • Amino Acids (glutamine, glycine, taurine, cysteine, methionine)
  • NAC/Glutathione
  • Magnesium
  • Flavonoids

Elimination

This phase is the actual removal of the toxins. Water-soluble substances go to the kidneys to be urinated out, and fat-soluble substances are packaged into bile and eliminated via the stool.

Bowels: Prioritize daily bowel movements since xenoestrogens are eliminated in the stool. Fruits, veggies, whole grains, lemon water, and a diet low in animal products improve size and ease of bowel movements.

Sweat: Use of any type of sauna for sweating out toxin. At least 20 minutes heavy sweating; 1-5 times a week.

Clean, Filtered Water: Consume enough water to support the elimination of toxins through your urine and stools. Good hydration supports your kidneys and ensures your bowels are working daily.

Xenoestrogen Check List

  • Be confident throwing out the toxic junk.
  • Remove toxins from the kitchen, bathroom, and laundry room.
  • Know what to replace the toxic stuff with.
  • Feel better about the products you buy, knowing they’re safer for you & your family.

Xenoestrogen References and Links

The Environmental Working Group (EWG)

The Environmental Working Group’s (EWG) mission is to empower people to live healthier lives in a healthier environment, just like us!

EWG is a non-profit, non-partisan organization dedicated to protecting human health and the environment. One of those ways is by offering education and empowering consumers to make safer and more informed decisions via EWG Consumer Guides. You’ll find over 12 guides, including the EWG’s Skin Deep Guide to Cosmetics (rates 70,000 personal care products) and EWG’s National Tap Water Database (how safe is your drinking water?) and EWG’s Guide to Healthy Cleaning (ranks 2,000 household cleaning products).

Want to know which fruits and vegetables have the most and least amount of pesticides? Get the EWG’s Dirty Dozen and Clean Fifteen lists to help guide your shopping decisions. EWG Dirty Dozen

The Endocrine Society

The Endocrine Society publishes four world-renowned journals and a monthly news magazine, holds scientific conferences, provides educational programs for physicians, issues clinical practice guidelines, promotes careers in endocrinology, and advocates for appropriate funding of scientific research in endocrinology and public policies that support the practice of clinical endocrinology.

The Cleveland Clinic

The Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Their mission is to provide better care of the sick, investigation into their problems, and further education of those who serve. The Cleveland Clinic is known for exceptional care delivered by multidisciplinary teams.

Reproductive health and the environment: counseling patients about risks
A conversation with a Cleveland Clinic physician about environmental toxins and your health

The Institute for Functional Medicine

Toxins and Toxicants as Drivers of Disease with Dr. Joseph Pizzorno. A physician, educator, researcher and expert spokesperson, Dr. Pizzorno is founding president of Bastyr University and has been the recipient of numerous awards and honors. In May 2003, the American Holistic Medical Association recognized him as a "Pioneer in Holistic Medicine." In May 2004, the Institute for Functional Medicine honored him with the Linus Pauling Award.

Known Contaminants in Drinking Water with Dr. Robert Rountree. He describes how different regions have potential toxins and how individual exposure vectors may be surprising. Dr. Rountree has provided his unique combination of traditional family medicine, nutrition, herbology, and mind-body therapy in Boulder, CO, since 1983. 

Estro-Adapt Endocrine Balance

Formulated to Combat Xenoestrogens

Estro-Adapt was formulated to combat the negative effects of toxic environmental xenoestrogens. Nutrients in this blend promote healthy liver detoxification, elimination of environmental xenoestrogens, and a healthy hormone balance in men and women.

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